App designed to help prevent suicide

“‘I don’t think I can go on’ or ‘no one really cares,’ those are the kind of phrases that pop out,” said Curry. “I would say those are good clues.”

FOX31 Denver

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DENVER — Before opening fire at his Washington state high school — shooting five classmates and then killing himself — Jaylen Fryberg sent out a series of cryptic Tweets.

The 15 year old posted: “May as well die now” and “I know it seems like I’m sweating it off — but I’m not, and I’ll never be able to.”

“That’s certainly a red flag,” said Dr. Larry Curry, a Denver family therapist, adding that teens often turn to social media, posting similar messages in a cry for help.

“‘I don’t think I can go on’ or ‘no one really cares,’ those are the kind of phrases that pop out,” said Curry. “I would say those are good clues.”

Now those telling clues on Twitter can be tracked with a new web-based app, Samaritan’s Radar.

The free app uses algorithms to track language used by people you…

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