United States Army Disabled Veteran, Sergeant Kericia E. Smith Faces Third Heartbreaking Trauma of Her Life

img_1132Many people, born and raised in the United States from an early age adhere to and are taught to pledge our allegiance to the flag, and ultimately our allegiance to America –the red, white and blue, that is, the bloodshed, or the honor and purity of white and of an unstained message; and, a color that results in the blue as like streaming tears that come, however, despite that scripture tell us to love our neighbors.

Our neighbors as those who reside here with us under God. One Nation undivided, in liberty and justice for all. Hence, it is a must that we all consider to look at this message with the question of how does it happen that bad things are a reality in a country so great as this?

How, is it the case, that my country does not have my back, or that, those who live here do not have my best interest and the interest of my family; or the interests of my neighbor at heart? How–can one still love their neighbor, or more specifically, how can my neighbor love me after this, that is, the trauma of the American Dream; and, we ask how does this massacre of U.S. citizenry happen?

Embracing Me as Her Journalist

Sergeant Kericia E. Smith said, “I think you should tell them why you decided to write this story,” and after thinking about it, or rather, after her prompting I have agreed to tell you her story sprinkled with my voice (together we will speak) so that those still asleep abiding in the American Dream can wake up to the travesties of life happening while you are sleeping? I accepted this story without too many reservations, because firstly as Americans we forget that to give does not come in the form of money only, especially when someone faces hardship reaching deep into their heart and soul. I have a heart and to believers, the scriptures tell us “Do not worry…”. Scriptures also tell us that we are to ‘bear one another’s burdens’.

Secondly, I have been trained well to understand that as a journalist I am called to be the proverbial ‘watchdog’ of the government and not only the government but those who connect with it to utilize law, and along with this understanding I see that the more professional journalists (some seemingly) care more about their bosses than a common cause among the people; however, I have no boss except the Most Highest God of this universe. Hence, the excuse is taken away of what will I eat or what I will wear.

Also, in this stance I as a writer, a mother, wife, grandmother and citizen take the pledge to uplift my neighbor in whichever way I can in honesty and fair dealing and I know that this is the Way, and, I believe scripture is true that He will provide. As a reward, I have been trained to help Sergeant Kericia E. Smith through this circumstance. In any case, I am more grateful in this instance that the Most High chose me to serve her. As a result, Sergeant Smith has created a new phrase calling me her ‘freestyle journalist’. It’s catchy would you agree?

We need you to look at this, and notably, this story is for anyone facing the trauma of inadequate care of yourself or a loved one in a hospital and or health care environment, and this message is also helpful for workers who see such horrendous events take place.

The Call for Help

I received a voicemail from Sergeant Kericia E. Smith, founder and CEO of the Association of Veteran Women, Incorporated [AOVW, Inc.] who (in short) explained that she needed a storyteller. Telling me, she was having some troubles, or rather, that she is having a few heartbreaking moments she wanted me to take a look at.

So I do not need to tell you how excited I was and unprepared for even this one. Subsequently, I learned she is named after her best friend pronounced [Ker (ee) sha], and they also share a birth month.

Sergeant Smith is an advocate for all women, but mainly for those women who have risked their life serving their country in the Armed Forces. Ultimately, a voice that until now has gone unheard, and, she is a miracle because I believe she is a groundbreaker and a trend setter for many who have lost hope. Hence, she fits the profile of a fighter, and she does not look like what she has been through. Thus, as divine connections happen she and I have worked diligently and have crafted a story that is beneficial for the public to know. However, before I move on, it is important that you know that Kericia initially called several journalists’, major newspapers and magazines to tell her story, but decidedly they were uninterested because there was no response. Kericia says, that someone told her to search out freelance journalists and she found my website The Dailey Grind where my motto is ‘Reporting what the news won’t.’  She told me, that she prayed and left a message, and I am the only one to respond to help her.

Therefore, I tell you Kericia this is it—the time is now and that God has prepared you for such a time as this! In the words of Ms. Shirley Chisolm, Kericia has decided that she is “Unbought and Unbossed!”  Essentially, she says “My misery has become my ministry!” I agree.

My Best Friend Died

I am Sergeant Kericia E. Smith. I am a disabled veteran diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder [PTSD], a trauma I acquired while on active duty. I was also my best friend’s primary caregiver, and is the reason why I want to tell you the story about my best friend who was admitted into Arlington Memorial Hospital for dehydration and a urinary tract infection, and who was later admitted to Kindred Rehabilitation Hospital for a bedsore. Moreover, in the process of admitting my best friend I was given admission papers to sign, but now in retrospect suspect there may have been a  Mandatory Binding Arbitration Clause. Nevertheless, I was never given a copy of any document I signed. However, in that case, what I do know is that my best friend was un-necessarily medicated to the point of a medically induced coma. As a result, they did not feed him, but without authorization inserted a feeding tube, gave him steroids and two blood thinners; along with, another drug that also causes bleeding.

In short, on May 16, 2016 at about 10:30 a.m., I walked into my best friend’s room and found him

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Custom Casket Spray

bleeding out severely, and all day long I begged the doctors and medical staff at Kindred Rehabilitation Hospital to transfer him to Arlington Memorial Hospital Emergency Room which is right across the street—they refused. Consequently, around 8:30 p.m., my best friend who was my father was unresponsive, and to my dismay there was no defibrillator available for them to attempt life-saving measures. Hence, my beloved father, a Medicare/Medicaid patient bleed-out and died.

To date, I have not been able to obtain my father’s death certificate because Kindred Rehabilitation Hospital has not filed or recorded it with the City of Arlington, or, Texas Department of Vital Statistics. I would also like to mention that Kloe my service dog was God sent and has done an outstanding job and has been a tremendous help throughout this ordeal—she saved me.

Please note, that if I had not fed my father and inserted a feeding tube, given him steroids, and if I had given two blood thinners; along with, another drug that causes bleeding and allowed him to bleed to death I would be in jail.  Needless to say, I am re-traumatized all over again, because (as mentioned) I was my father’s primary caregiver.  I witnessed my father’s death and it was nothing I could do to help him. Consequently, it is a sad day in America that I served my country since I was 18 years old, and yet, my father had no medical staff including doctors to care enough to let me save my father’s life by answering my pleas to transfer him to the emergency room across the street. I ask how can they continue to receive federal and state funds? These doctors and medical staff took an oath to save lives so how could they just stand by and let my precious beloved father die for no good reason?  

This is not an attack on all medical professionals or providers, and, it is in my personal opinion that there are excellent hospitals, doctors, nurses and other medical staff who give quality care to all their patients. However, at Kindred Rehabilitation Hospital my father did not receive the quality lifesaving treatment that he deserved. [Sergeant Kericia E. Smith, United States Army, and Army Reserve; Disabled Veteran; Face to Face Interview, Thursday, September 15, 2016; 4:30 p.m.].

This is a heartbreaking and touching story. Conversely, as I was writing and recounting her pain it is easy to visualize this scene taking place in the hospital, because for those of us who have lost a parent or both parents we understand grief– but not this way. Moreover, perhaps there is someone who can attest to this type trauma, or, those people who have experienced the trauma firsthand and know the full picture. Hence, here I will recount to highlight some of the facts Sergeant Smith mentioned so that we all will understand better the plight Sergeant Smith and her dad suffered at the hand of medical professionals who take an oath to save the lives of the people they treat.

A Brief Background Check of Kindred Rehabilitation Hospitals

Renamed Kindred Healthcare in 2001–Vencor (1998), was one of the nation’s most prominent healthcare companies, however, the company has a shady and elusive past and is due for a background check if you are considering this source for your loved ones. Kindred Healthcare Corporation is the largest healthcare company in the United States with a net worth of $7 billion (See: Kindred Hospital Annual Reports). Accordingly, Kindred Healthcare works under a plethora of venues, such as, post-acute services; including, transitional hospital care, short-term rehabilitation, skilled nursing, home health, long-term care, assisted living,  nursing facilities, palliative care and hospice.

Here is a breakdown of events:

Frederick D. Smith (October 11, 1937 - May 16, 2016)

Frederick D. Smith (October 11, 1937 – May 16, 2016)

   A Last Word from Sergeant Kericia E. Smith

Vencor/Kindred’s long history of wrongdoing seems to always survive and thrive due to Medicare fraud which only adds insult to injury with the loss of my father.  If these Medicare fraud cases were known to the public then our loved ones would be less likely to be put at risk.  Kindred seems to look at ‘profits over patients,’ and our lives are worthless because Kindred medical staff is reckless with our medical care. Additionally, any other business as unethical and abusive would have gone out of business decades ago, yet, Kindred continues to thrive on recklessly committing Medicare fraud. 

Why has the Department of Justice not been more aggressive at informing the public about Kindred’s record of bad behavior? It is the case, that Kindred decayed decades ago from the inside out, and this should send a stench up our noses because the carcasses of our loved ones are not collateral damage and the loss of life should cry out for justice. Nevertheless, we are told ‘If you see something to say something!’ Consequently, I did see something, and I said something, but they did absolutely nothing! It is absolutely appalling! Kindred Rehabilitation Hospital had NO Defibrillator!

I am Sergeant Kericia E. Smith and I approve this message—over and out!
[Sergeant Kericia E. Smith, Electronic Communication, September 21, 2016; 5:31p.m.].

Related Articles and Additional Resources

Also see:

Please stay tuned for more detailed information concerning Kindred Healthcare facilities the Tort Reform and Medicaid/Medicare Fraud (False Claims Act).

For more information on Association Of Veteran Women, Incorporated call:

Sergeant Kericia E. Smith, (817)461-5116. Or send an email to: aovwinc@aol.com

 

kayla-dailey__picKayla Dailey, is a prolific writer whose aspirations include hope of encouraging those who face trials and difficulties in life through the written word. As a student of the word she writes, Kayla has earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from Ashford University, and holds, a Master of Arts Degree in Organizational Management with specialty in Public Administration. Mrs. Dailey is an advocate for civic and community building issues, African American liberties, equal employment, and now veterans and their families; as well as, advocacy against domestic violence for women, children, abortion and other issues people face.  

© Copyright 2016. The Dailey Grind. All Rights Reserved.

Sin in the Big House

In Americathe people of society have become hypocrites, and even the fabric of integrity

which has made America great has been cast aside and replaced with Godlessness. Correctional institutions spring up everywhere with the intention to keep hardened criminals; the bad actors of society away from so-called “good citizens,” but the people kept have become an outlet for clandestine activities and fantasies of the undercover  wicked. Why is it that in the public eye, and the stigma of homosexuality has been broadcast as wrong with reasons given that if one is to have sex then it should be between a man and a woman? Yet, the act of homosexuality has replaced the Godly act between man and woman with a lie; men with men is un-natural and is wrong because God says it is whether behind prison walls or without.  Thus, homosexuality has become an acceptable reason among society that this should take place there; just as unwed sex has been accepted by the whole of society; it is wrong in prison and without. The conversation of sex in prison goes further to say that it is wrong for the guard and prisoner to participate; but why? Is it wrong because it is an act between guard and prisoner, or because two unmarried people should not have sex in the first place? First, it is wrong because God says it, “thou shalt not commit fornication” (Exodus 20:14). Secondly, to have sex while one is incarcerated; especially between an employee of the state and the prisoner he is hired to watch is wrong. It is also noted that not only are most of these excursions between guard and inmate frequent but that each encounter may be coerced; threats of any kind against a human life whether prisoner or free is wrong. Certainly coerced sex is not consensual, because it is rape and  it is wrong. Hence, prison life reveals prisoners raping fellow prisoners in violent attacks, and there is notice of racial initiated vengeance acted out through sexual upheaval.

Prison overcrowding seems to be an additive to an already aggravated situation.

Surely, a guarded prisoner should not endure such horrible treatment from anyone, and especially someone who is of like gender. What rights have another human being no matter the race to take advantage of another human being; hence, homosexuality is wrong and rape is wrong no matter who it is. Women seem to face an even more horrid ordeal than do their male counterparts upon entrance into prison grounds where homosexuality and rape among the females; surprisingly is as common if not more so than that of the men. Society paints a picture of guards being taken advantage of by the women, duped, manipulated into trade of  sexual favors for outside commodities such as drugs and cigarettes not available for the prisoners they guard, but could it be the situation at hand is most certainly initiated and coerced by male guards who can’t fight the temptation; a natural phenomenon  which attracts them to the female they were born to hunt? It is lust at the height of its passion inside the big house as once again someone is literally “screwed” in the name of justice. (De Amicis, A., (2005), Para. 3) Table 1: Taken from GAO Report, GAO/GGD-99-104, page-8 Staff-on-Inmate Sexual Misconduct Allegations Reported and Sustained at BOP, California, and Texas Female Prisons, Calendar Years 1995 to 1998. (De Amicis, A., (2005).

English: Prison guard at Parramatta Correction...English: Prison guard at Parramatta Correctional Centre (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Calendar years 1995 to 1998 Staff-on-inmate sexual misconduct BOP California Texas Total Number of allegations reported

  • 236 BOP
  • 117 California
  • 153 Texas
  • 506 Total

Number of allegations sustained (staff  resignations, employment terminations, or other administrative sanctions)

  • 22 BOP
  • 22 California
  • 48 Texas
  • 92 Total

Total allegations sustained as apercentage of allegations reported

  • 9% BOP
  • 19% California
  • 31% Texas
  • 18% Total

According to the above graph it is obvious that guards are more involved than they admit when it comes to rape and the female prisoner.

A view for the years of 1995 to 1998 reveals

  • 22 allegations for the years during 1995 to 1998
  • 18 staff resigned, 3 were employment terminations and
  • 1 staff reassignment.

As table 1 reflects, each of these allegations involved sexual abuse which is defined by the law as potentially criminal conduct. Out of these 22 allegations, the facts support that 14 allegations were sustained and resulted in criminal prosecution with convictions.” The author goes further to state that there were 6 out if 7 of the officers accused who resigned, and neither faced derogative comments in their file, or jail time. (De Amicis, A., (2005), Para1).

It seems unfair that not all accused don’t face more of a reprimand or suffer lengthy prison sentences because any way the situation is viewed it is rape and is certainly unfair treatment and abuse of women. What is impressive about human beingsbeing kept like cattle or horses in stalls? What is being done to eliminate inhumane conditions,  because according to statistics in relation to prison overcrowding numbers indeed are at a recording breaking high? Further noted is the  result of this overcrowding, sexual abuse, violence, and other unethical conditions is overwhelming. Mariner states, “Prison overcrowding has expanded and has failed to keep up with the pace of inmate numbers.” She states further, “that many state prisons squeeze in many more people than there are designed to hold which leave them bursting at the seams. Numbers indicate that 15 percent of state prisons are in operation above capacity, and federal prisons are 31 percent above recommended capacity”(Mariner, J., (2002), pp. 9, Para 9-10).

The lack of adequate staff  that may also be a cause of prison overflowing from the seams, and it is also noted that not only are trained staff officers scarce, the lack of available funds seem to be an issue when it comes to educating and preparation for duty. Texas is an example given with supra problems in the area of trained corrections staff in the area of inmate work, substance abuse programs and other areas of need. Hence, because of lack of sufficient pay there is an astronomical turnover for staff; being that many are apt to quit because they are underpaid. ” (Mariner, J., (2002), pp. 9, Para 9-10).

“Also, lawsuits filed by prisoners indicate that there is a lack of humane conditions and respect found in offenses like:  “around the clock rack downs in small windowless cells, unheated rooms, no exercise equipment, twenty-four hour video surveillance with female guards to watch them shower and  urinate. Enhanced mental illness issues seem to be a problem as well because of overcrowding, and are under scrutiny by judicial official. There are also reports stating that that those suffering mental illness whose condition and symptoms isolates them, and who face further isolation because of these crowed conditions. The authors states, “the scrutiny of judicial affiliates warranted investigation of complaints filed by plaintiffs included; social isolation, idleness, and limited sensory stimulus aggravated the symptoms of the mentally ill.” (Mariner, J., (2002), pp. 10, Para 7). Therefore, one wonders what is to be the outcome of such horrid and inhumane conditions? Surely there must be further scrutiny and evaluation of issues faced by prisoners who live this way. For rape conjugal visits seem to be a consideration for some male prisoners.

Plans for the future seem to be of immediate concern; the author notes that “The United States Supreme Court has declared that prison rape constitutes “cruel and unusual punishment” under the Eighth Amendment of the U.S Constitution. Despite widespread recognition of the problem, prison officials and law enforcement agencies take little action to combat the occurrence of male rape within the U.S. prison system. Inmates report that prison officials often do not investigate claims of male prison rape and prosecutors rarely bring charges against the perpetrators.” (Wyatt, R., (2006), pp. 579-80, Para. 2).

The graph above shows that this statement is true, and since this is so what can be done for those that can’t seem to keep themselves to themselves. One option is to allow them conjugal visits, but does it, will it work? To reiterate an earlier statement humans are sexual creatures; especially men because of their need sex causes problems. The  author brings another point of view which says, “Prison authorities tend to report lower incidences of prison rape. According to the U.S. Justice Department, only 10% of inmates report physical or sexual assaults. Prison officials admit, however, that they may under report incidents of rape because it is hard for them to tell whether sex acts in prison are non-consensual.” Inmates are often coerced into performing sex acts through non-physical means and appear to be willing participants. Some inmates agree to engage in sex acts with other inmates because they are afraid that if they refuse to do so they will be severely beaten. Therefore, it may seem to prison officials that they have consented to participate in sexual relationships with other inmates.” (Wyatt, R., (2006), pp. 587, Para. 1).

What are the effects of rape in prison whether it male or female? “Psychologically, suicide is one out that prisoner’s take. There is an account of a young boy who was placed in an adult facility because he committed arson, and was there only a week when he was attacked and raped.  The author goes on to say that medical examination declared and confirmed rape, and the boy asked to be placed in single cell for fear of his safety; but was not. The young man wrote home to his father telling him of the violent assaults happening to him, and as the rapes continued the boy finally having enough of it hung himself. (Wyatt, R., (2006), pp. 589, Para. 1).

Concerning health “Studies indicate that the HIV rate among prisoners is “several fold higher” than that of the general public, and indicates that being incarcerated is a cause of the spread of the deadly virus.” (Wyatt, R., (2006), pp. 589-590, Para. 1, 2,).The financial costs of those raped in prison are astronomical, because of law suits brought against prison officials, substance abuse treatment once outside of prison increases. Therefore, costs increase to treat ex-convicts, and there is difficulty for some people to readjust to life outside prison walls; this in turn also affects the safety of society as a whole when people who have suffered brutalized rapes are more likely to commit more crimes outside prison. The author states that, “This finding is especially troubling when one considers that approximately 600,000 inmates are released from U.S. state and federal prisons systems each year.” (Wyatt, R., (2006), pp. 591, Para. 1). Surely, society has an even bigger problem than the law broken. It is when in the midst of despair and defeat people of the religious community say the answer is found in hope in God, and this view begins to make sense when unethical and sinful behaviors run riot for those held captive in the prison system? Is God the way out?  Prison Chaplains seem to think so and consider their job of importance. The author states, “From the research that has been conducted, investigators have found that chaplains occupy a unique position between prisoners and their custodians by overseeing rehabilitation efforts and by serving as “agents of change.” (Kerley, Matthews & Shoemaker, (2009), pp. 88, Para 2).

Ultimately, America must come to acceptance of the error of its ways. Yes, it is right seeking justice for those who break the law to be punished, but along with the punishment; does the thought that rape is, or that homosexuality  is wrong because of only those free? America needs its integrity back, because it is wrong for prisoners to be forced into positions of compromise because one fear for their life. One man’s tale gives evidence of the decision to give up and give into the brutal attacks comes on him saying,” “I had no choice but to submit to being [an inmate ‘s]prison wife. Out of fear for my life, I submitted to sucking his dick, being fucked in my ass, and performing other duties as a woman, such as making his bed. ” “I’m a tall white male, who unfortunately has a small amount of feminine characteristics. . . . These characteristics have got me raped [in prison] so many times I have no more feelings physically. I have been raped by up to 5 black men and two white men at a time. “I go through nightmares of being raped and sexually assaulted. I can’t stop thinking about it. I feel everyone is looking at me in a sexual way.” (Wyatt, R., (2006), pp. 579, Para. 1).  Homosexuality is wrong as is prisoner-guard relations because God says it, and most certainly rape is wrong; because it tears down human dignity and character. America it is time to wake up and do something about your sin problem in the big house.

©Copyright,2011, (Dailey, K., 2011)

References:

Kerley, Kent, R, Matthews, Todd, L., & Shoemaker, J. (2009). A Simple Plan, A Simple Faith: Chaplains and Lay Ministers in Mississippi Prison, Review of Religious Research, 2009. Volume 51(1): Pages 87-103. Retrieved from: http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/

De Amicis, A., (2005).  An Ethical Dilemma in Corrections. (August 21, 2005). Retrieved from: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/212621.pdf

Wyatt, R., (2006). MALE RAPE IN U.S. PRISONS: ARE CONJUGAL VISITS THE ANSWER?. Web Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law, 2006, Vol. 37 Issue 2/3, p579-614, 36p.  Retrieved from:  http//content.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?

Sargent A., (2010). Representing Prison Rape: Race, Masculinity, and Incarceration in Donald Goines’s White Man’s Justice, Black Man’s Grief. MELUS, Fall2010, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p131-155, 25p.  Retrieved from:  http://content.ebscohost.com/pdf23_24/pdf/2010/MEL/01Sep10/53071781.pdf?T

Mariner, J., (2002). Behind Bars in America. Human Rights, Spring2002, Vol. 29 Issue 2, p9, 3p Retrieved from: http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/