Tarrant County Crack Down, Child Support

Tarrant County Courthouse, Fort Worth, Texas

Tarrant County Courthouse, Fort Worth, Texas (Photo credit: Ken Lund)

Today it is not uncommon for fathers to struggle with no support when the mother is absent; it is not the case anymore that women are the ones left with the burden of single parenthood.

 

Just ask any single parent who, for whatever reason has the misfortune of raising children alone and you will hear a resounding chime as they tell you it gets hard, but what can be done?
According to the Tarrant County District Attorney’s Office, a partnership with 8 Tarrant County Constables has led to 22 arrests for failure to pay their child support. In the August Press Release entitled, “Tarrant County Constables Conduct Child Support Roundup,” reports state, “The Tarrant County constables who participated in the initiative are: Pct. 1 Constable Jerry Crowder, Pct. 2 Constable Robert McGinty, Pct. 3 Constable Zane Hilger, Pct. 4 Constable Dub Bransom, Pct. 5 Constable Sergio Deleon, Pct. 6 Constable Joe Kubes, Pct. 7 Constable Clint Burgess and Pct. 8 Constable Chester Luckett.”
The article goes on to state that those arrested were wanted by authorities for failing to meet their obligated payments.
The Attorney General gives a stern warning saying, “Parents who have outstanding warrants can avoid the embarrassment of arrest at their home or work by turning themselves in to the Tarrant County Jail. Parents who have fallen behind on their child support payments – but are not yet subject to warrants for their arrest – should immediately contact the Attorney General’s Child Support Division at (800) 252-8014 to make payment arrangements.”
State and Federal law determines reprimand for each perspective state; hence, in Tarrant County the duty of the Attorney is to serve those families who request service or those who receive public assistance.

Services offered by the Tarrant County Child Support Division are as follows:
• locating absent parents;
• establishing paternity for children born to unmarried parents;
• establishing, enforcing and modifying child and medical support orders;
• and collecting and distributing child support payments.
The report adds, in 2010 parents in the State Texas had paid more than $241,000,000 in support to their children.
To find out more: Click Here 

Watch: New Child Support Law Texas

 

The West Nile Virus: Big Tex-Demic

Aedes Albopictus, blood-fed

Not only do Texas residents fight heat this year, but along with the heat come mosquitoes; and not only mosquitoes, but “killer” mosquitoes which carry the West Nile Virus.

Summer in Texas is full of things to do; like swimming, boating, fishing and other water activities where there is no surprise that with summer come mosquitoes. However, people are being warned this year to head indoors before dusk. Why? Because this year’s mosquito bites can be deadly.

According to Center for Disease Control there have been 392 Neuroinvasive disease cases  reported this year; as well as, 341 non-neuroinvasive reports of the deadly virus which rounds up to more than 730 cases so far, and 30 people have  died as a result.

CDC is warning everyone to stay indoors between the hours of dusk and dawn, and protect themselves.

What are the symptoms? Keep in mind that the symptoms are flu like and can include the following:

  • fever
  • headache
  • neck and back stiffness
  • muscle ache
  • tiredness
  • joint pain
  • swollen glands
  • rash

Who is at risk?

Children, and adults 50 and over; as well as those whose immune systems have been weaken by HIV/AIDS, Cancer, and various organ transplants.

Preventative measures:

  • Wear insect repellent. Repellents that include one of these ingredients are best: DEET, lemon eucalyptus, or picaridin.
  • When possible, wear socks, long sleeves, and long pants when outside.
  • If you see a dead bird, don’t touch it — it could be infected. Wear gloves and mask to be safe.
  • Empty any standing water that may be a breeding ground for mosquito larvae.

Source:

CDC: West Nile Virus

What’s West Nile?

More Information:

More News on Virus in Texas : Click Here

Texas Preventative Measures: Click Here

mosquitos messed up
mosquitos messed up (Photo credit: quapan)
English: The proboscis of an Aedes albopictus ...

English: The proboscis of an Aedes albopictus mosquito feeding on human blood. Under experimental conditions the Aedes albopictus mosquito, also known as the Asian Tiger Mosquito, has been found to be a vector of West Nile Virus. Aedes is a genus of the Culicine family of mosquitos. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)